Posts Tagged "acceptance and commitment therapy"

Becoming More Psychologically-Flexible Through the Observing Self

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Becoming More Psychologically-Flexible Through the Observing Self

In a recent post I discussed the six components of psychological flexibility. Valued living (defining valued directions).   Contact with the Present Moment (mindfulness). Committed Action (commitment). Acceptance (acceptance). Observing Self (self-as-context). Disentanglement (cognitive defusion) One of the goals of Acceptance and Commitment (AC) Coaching is having clients cultivate and view the world from the perspective of the observing self – that silent, quiet part of the self that persists through time, observing and noticing change in the world, containing all the changes that go on...

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Building Psychological Flexibility Through Acceptance

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Building Psychological Flexibility Through Acceptance

  In a recent post I discussed the six components of psychological flexibility. Valued Living, Mindfulness, Acceptance,  Commitment,  Observing Self, and Disentanglement (Anstiss & Blonna, 2014). In this post I want to focus on Acceptance. Acceptance  has four components: accepting reality for what it is accepting what you can and cannot control accepting that trying to avoid, eliminate, or control painful internal factors actually makes them worse accepting that the best way to manage painful internal factors is to accept them, and co-exist with them as you shift your focus off of them...

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Becoming More Psychologically-Flexible Through Commitment

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Becoming More Psychologically-Flexible Through Commitment

In a recent post I discussed the six components of psychological flexibility: Valued Living, Mindfulness, Acceptance,  Commitment, Observing Self, and Disentanglement. In this post I want to focus on Commitment (Anstiss & Blonna, 2014). Commitment is the action part of Acceptance and Commitment (AC) Coaching. When clients commit to something, they pledge to follow through with their plans. Remember: Acceptance involves having clients become more mindful of what is going on in their internal (thoughts, feelings etc.) and external (behavior, physical environment) environments and...

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Becoming More Psychologically-Flexible Through Mindfulness Training

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Becoming More Psychologically-Flexible Through Mindfulness Training

In a recent post I discussed the six components of psychological flexibility. Valued living (defining valued directions).   Contact with the Present Moment (mindfulness). Committed Action (commitment). Acceptance (acceptance). Observing Self (self-as-context). Disentanglement (cognitive defusion). In this post I want to focus on what Contact With the present Moment (Mindfulness) means and how to help your clients become more mindful. Mindfulness is best described as moment-by-moment awareness. There are four dimensions of mindful moments. They are (1) present centered, (2) non-judgmental,...

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Help Your Clients Get Unstuck by Becoming More Psychologically Flexible

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Help Your Clients Get Unstuck by Becoming More Psychologically Flexible

In this blog I will discuss the six key factors called core processes that contribute to psychological inflexibility and clients getting stuck. I then want to describe the Tools and Techniques used to help clients become more psychologically flexible and get unstuck. I want to look at the core processes and the tools and techniques from both an ACT perspective and an AC Coaching  view. The original six core processes that lead to clients being psychologically inflexible were originally described in the ACT Hexaflex Model (see Figure # 1.) or ACT Model of Psychopathology  (Strosahl, et. al,...

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